The whistle was correct in all details.
Closing my eyes I see it now: petrol blue, wool and mohair, Italian cut, flat-fronted, side adjusters, zip fly, sixteen-inch bottoms, central vent on the jacket, flap pockets, ticket pocket, three button (only one done up of course), high-breaking, narrow lapels, buttonhole on the left, four buttons on the cuff – claret silk lining. On the record player in the corner, one of those beige and brown jobs with a thin metal spindle to accommodate a stack of 45s, just one single: ‚Too Hard to Handle‘ by Otis Redding, possibly on import, definitely on Stax. As the soul man punched out his deep Memphis rhythms, so the boy in the suit did a slow-motion council-estate shuffle across the floral fitted carpet we’d recently bought on HP from the Co-op. The music was his soundtrack; the dance was strictly for display. The shoes that shone out from beneath this paragon of a two-piece were Royals. I was entranced. This, as my lovably idiolectic mum said, was ‚all the go‘. This was what you grew up for.
The suit didn’t come as a surprise. Barry had been waiting weeks for this moment and we’d been with him all the way, getting reports back, getting excited as the day approached. It wasn’t so much that a suit like this was worth the wait, more that the wait was worth savouring. The process itself was sumptuous, the measurements and the fittings, meetings even, the discussion of cut, cloth and linings, with a tailor somewhere off the Edgware Road. In 1965, for a sixteen-year-old boy from Burnt Oak via Notting Dale, to have meetings and a tailor to call his own was quite something, but then Barry was something – he was a mod. He was one.

So beginnt das Buch The Way We Wore von Robert Elms. Es ist eine Geschichte seiner Kleidung, die er mit einer Sozialgeschichte Englands verbindet. Das ist eigentlich das einzig Interessante an der Mode; es ist nicht wirklich interessant, Markennamen aufzuzählen oder Klamottenwissen zu verbreiten, sondern das zu beschreiben, was kulturell dahinter steht. Wir sind mit dem Anfang des Buches nicht in der Welt der Savile Row, wir sind in Notting Hill. Und das ist nicht das Notting Hill, in dem ein leicht vertrottelter Buchhändler, der aussieht wie Hugh Grant, eine hübsche Frau im Laden trifft, die aussieht wie Julia Roberts. Die gentrification hat noch nicht stattgefunden.

Dies ist noch das Notting Hill der Straßenschlachten von 1958, das Notting Hill des Immobilienspekulaten Peter Rachmann, der sein Imperium mit Hilfe von Gangstern kontrolliert. Dies ist das London der Kriminellen, das London von Mördern wie den Kray Zwillingen. They were the best years of our lives. They called them the swinging sixties. The Beatles and the Rolling Stones were rulers of pop music, Carnaby Street ruled the fashion world… and me and my brother ruled London. We were fucking untouchable… wird Ronnie Kray in seiner Autobiographie My Story schreiben.
Wenn ich die schon erwähne, sollte ich auch die Autobiographie seines Konkurrenten Charlie RichardsonMy Manor erwähnen. Gripping… takes you through a panting half-century of beatings and scams and stir-crazy outbursts, schrieb derIndependent on Sunday damals. Beide Bücher (natürlich mit Hilfe von Ghostwritern geschrieben) sind die Lektüre wert, leider haben beide keinen Index. Damit hätte man schneller einen Überblick, mit wem von Londons High Society die Verbrecher damals verkehren, me and my brother ruled London. We were fucking untouchable. Und kein Geringerer als David Bailey photographiert die Kray Brüder. Ronnie lässt seine Frau Kate von Lord Lichfield (der auch die ➱Werbung für ➱Burberry photographierte) ablichten. Cool.

Wie komme ich auf dies alles? Ich habe am Freitag, wie Sie wahrscheinlich auch, die Eröffnung der Olympischen Spiele im Fernsehen gesehen, mit diesem kolossalen Bilderbogen englischer Geschichte und Sozialgeschichte. Und der Spracharmut von einer Schnarchnase wie Wolf-Dieter Poschmann, der mit all dem, was sich vor seinen Augen abspielte, nichts anfangen konnte. Das fing mit ➱Blakes Jerusalem an, zu dem man einiges hätte sagen können. Es ist ja kein Zufall, dass Jerusalem am Anfang des Traumspiels von Danny Boyle stand. Aber den Kenneth Branagh hat er erkannt, toll. Dass der aber ➱Isambard Kingdom Brunel sein sollte, dass begriffen Poschmann und seine Gehilfen nicht.

Und weshalb spricht Brunel plötzlich den Monolog des Caliban aus Shakespeares Tempest?

Be not afeard; the isle is full of noises,
Sounds, and sweet airs, that give delight and hurt not.
Sometimes a thousand twangling instruments
Will hum about mine ears; and sometime voices
That, if I then had waked after long sleep,
Will make me sleep again; and then in dreaming,
The clouds methought would open, and show riches
Ready to drop upon me, that when I waked
I cried to dream again.

Poschmann beantwortete keine der Fragen, die ein Fernsehzuschauer haben konnten. Im Zweifelsfall schwieg er lieber. Nur nicht während der Schweigeminute. Aber Mr Bean hat er erkannt. Womit Poschmann und seine Gehilfen nun gar nichts anfangen konnten, war eine Gruppe von Farbigen in grauen Zweireihern, weißen Hemden, mit Hut und einem Koffer. Das hätte einen gebildeten englischen Kommentator an die Empire Windrush erinnert, die 1948 die ersten farbigen Engländer aus Jamaica nach London bringt. Viele werden folgen. Sie tragen die Kleidung des weißen Mannes, aber sie bringen ihre eigene Kultur mit.

Und sie bringen den Calypso mit. Wie der Musiker, der sich Lord Kitchener nennt, der auch auf der Empire Windrushnach London gekommen ist (hier der Cover der vorzüglichen CD London is the Place for Me: Trinidadian Calypso in London, 1950-1954). Und sie bringen natürlich ihren eigene Sprache und ihren eigenen Stil mit. Immer Anzüge (auch wenn die noch so billig sind), und immer Hut. Sie finden Wohnraum in Notting Hill, wo sie dann von Peter Rachmann schamlos ausgebeutet werden. Und sie bauen, das muss ganz klar und laut gesagt werden, das Nachkriegsengland mit auf.

Diese Leistung wird von der Anhängern des Union Movement des Faschisten Oswald Mosley natürlich nicht gewürdigt. Mosleys Anhänger, die aus der working classkommen und sich in einer Travestie des ➱Neo-Edwardian Style der Savile Row verkleiden, werden sich Straßenschlachten mit den Einwanderern aus der Karibik liefern. Das ist schon ein witziges Phänomen, dass eine kurzzeitige Moderichtung der upper class jetzt ein so schnelles trickling down erfährt und zu einem Kampfanzug für Straßenschlachten wird. Die Straßenschlachten werden eines Tages in die Notting Hill Riots münden. Und da hat Notting Hill wieder mal einen schlechten Namen.

Während nur die kleine Gruppe der Angry Young Men die Klassengegensätze (meistens in Englands Norden) thematisiert, schweigt die englische Literatur zu dem, was sich da auf den Straßen von London abspielt. Nur ein Autor schreibt Notting Hill in den Roman: Colin MacInnes. Absolute Beginners (der auch eine Verfilmung als Musikfilm mit David Bowie erlebte, darüber sage ich lieber nix) ist der Mittelteil einer London Trilogie, die aus den Romanen City of Spades (1957),Absolute Beginners (1959) und Mr Love and Justice besteht. Absolute Beginners ist ein Kultroman über eine Jugend in London in den Fifties. Unser junger altkluger Held, ein Photograph, fährt eine Vespa wie so viele Jugendliche, die jetzt Mods heißen. Und die sich scharf von den Teddy Boys absetzen. Es ist auch a battle of styles. Zum ersten Mal in der Geschichte gibt es jetzt klar durch Kleidung und Lifestyle unterscheidbare Jugendkulturen in England. Und da kann man so arm sein, wie man will. Es wird gespart und gespart, bis man sich den ersten Anzug von einem billigen Schneider leisten kann, so wie Robert Elms sechzehnjähriger Bruder in dem Text oben: This was ‚all the go‘. This was what you grew up for.

Der Roman Absolute Beginners spielt vor dem Hintergrund der Notting Hill Riots, und unser Held muss am Ende mitansehen, dass sein Freund The Wiz bei den Teddy Boys gelandet ist. Der Roman ist hervorragend geschrieben, er hat stilistisch jene street credibility, die die Modefuzzis immer ihren neuesten Klamotten zuschreiben. Ich gebe mal eine kleine Leseprobe. Schon die ersten beiden Sätze sind unnachahmlich:

Whoever thought up the Thames embankment was a genius. It lies curled firm and gentle round the river like a boy does with a girl, after it’s over, and it stretches in a great curve from the parliament thing, down there in Westminster, all the way north and east into the City. Going in that way, downstream, eastwards, it’s not so splendid, but when you come back up along it — oh! If the tide’s in, the river’s like the ocean, and you look across the great wide bend and see the fairy advertising palaces on the south side beaming in the water, and that great white bridge that floats across it gracefully, like a string of leaves. If you’re fortunate, the cab gets all the greens, and keeps up the same steady speed, and looking out from the upholstery it’s like your own private Cinerama, except that in this one the show’s never, never twice the same. And weather makes no difference, or season, it’s always wonderful — the magic always works. And just above the diesel whining of the taxi, you hear those river noises that no one can describe, but you can always recognize. Each time I come here for the ride, in any mood, I get a lift, a rise, a hoist up into joy. And as I gazed out on the water like a mouth, a bed, a sister, I thought how, my God, I love this city, horrible though it may be, and never ever want to leave it, come what it may send me. Because though it seems so untidy, and so casual, and so keep-your-distance-from-me, if you can get to know this city well enough to twist it round your finger, and if you’re its son, it’s always on your side, supporting you — or that’s what I imagined.

Ich habe mir nur eine Facette aus der Geschichtsstunde herausgepickt, die Danny Boyle der Welt gegeben hat. Es war, um noch einmal The Tempest zu zitieren, such stuff as dreams are made on. Man hätte über alles andere schreiben können, aber ich dachte mir, ich nehme mir mal diesen Aspekt. Was Danny Boyle da konzipiert hat, hat mit der Kulturgeschichte Englands zu tun. Und die Kultur ist irgendwie beim ZDF in den denkbar schlechtesten Händen. Aber es gab in der dreistündigen extravaganza ja auch ein wenig Sport, Szenen aus der Welt des ➱Cricket. Und was sagte Poschmann da? Gar nix. Der Poschmann verdient über 15.000 Euro im Monat, da hätte er doch mal ein paar Tausender einem gebildeten Engländer geben können, der das Ganze verstand. Oder er hätte natürlich das Commentators Manuallesen können, das die BBC verteilt hatte. Horrorshow am Mikrofontitelte die taz und schrieb weiter Der Gegensatz könnte nicht größer sein: Die Eröffnung der Olympiade war überwältigend, die deutschen Moderatoren hingegen null inspiriert, kein bisschen eloquent und gnadenlos inkompetent. Und das Boulevardblatt tz aus München höhnte: Trost für den gegeißelten Zuschauer: Damit steht der schlechteste deutsche Teilnehmer von London bereits fest, da kommt kein Schwimmer mit.

The Ceremony is an attempt to capture a picture of ourselves as a nation, where we have come from and where we want to be. The best part of telling that story has been working with our 10,000 volunteers. I’ve been astounded by the selfless dedication of the volunteers, they are the purest embodiment of the Olympic spirit and represent the best of who we are as a nation, hat Danny Boyle über sein Spektakel gesagt. Es hat nicht allen gefallen, ein gewisser Daniel Pounds aus Norwich schreibt an den GuardianDanny Boyle’s bricolage of bullshit was the most expensive sixth-form play in history. I am still recovering from serious montage assault. Aber die positiven Stimmen überwiegen. Und der Reverend Dr John Lampard wies am Ende seines Leserbriefs an den Guardian noch darauf hin: If this reading is seen as too theological, it might be pointed out that the ceremony had more hymns in it than an average Songs of Praise.

Während der Proben für das Schauspiel hat Danny Boyle seinen Freiwilligen gesagt: there will be an emptiness that you’ll have to fill with some other part of your lives. Ja, was kommt danach? Was wird aus Poschmann? Und was wird aus England? Letztere Frage wirft Damon Peacock aus Leyland – dem die Anspielung auf die Empire Windrush während der Show nicht entgangen ist – auf: I have to admire the subtlety of the political message. It posited 1948 as the turning point in British society. At that moment, we reward ourselves for inventing industrialism and saving democracy by giving ourselves an entitlement to care from cradle to grave. At the same moment, the Empire Windrush arrives with the immigrants who will do the work which we now feel is beneath us. We spend the next 54 years entertaining ourselves with pop music and films and comedy instead of working, while still being in thrall to an establishment personified by the royals and the Archbishop of Canterbury (looking fidgety in the VIP box).

     We then finally lose our grip completely and fall into a pit of internet addiction, where everyone’s attention span is so diminished that we demand an ever shorter series of blipverts. This vision is then cemented by a parade of narcissistic youth carrying video cameras, many of them pointed at themselves. The revolution will not be televised, because it won’t happen; we’ll all be too busy updating our Facebook pages.Darüber könnte man mal nachdenken. Und natürlich hat neben dem Jahr 1948 (dem Jahr der Ankunft der Empire Windrush und der Geburt des National Health Service) Calibans Monolog in Danny Boyles Konzept eine zentrale Bedeutung. In diesem attempt to capture a picture of ourselves as a nation, where we have come from and where we want to be. Und deshalb stehen die wunderbaren Zeilen hier noch einmal:

Be not afeard; the isle is full of noises,
Sounds, and sweet airs, that give delight and hurt not.
Sometimes a thousand twangling instruments
Will hum about mine ears; and sometime voices
That, if I then had waked after long sleep,
Will make me sleep again; and then in dreaming,
The clouds methought would open, and show riches
Ready to drop upon me, that when I waked
I cried to dream again.
Advertisements